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Internal Corrosion & Protection of it in Oil and Gas Pipelines

In oil and gas pipelines, the presence of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide and free water can cause severe corrosion problems. . Internal corrosion in wells and pipelines is influenced by temperature, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide content, water chemistry, flow velocity, oil or water wetting and composition and surface condition of the steel. A small change in one of these parameters can change the corrosion rate considerably, due to changes in the properties of the thin layer of corrosion products that accumulates on the steel surface.

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Microbial Fouling of Oil and Gas Wells can Cause Plugging

Plugging is a common experience for oil and gas wells to begin to lose their production capacity long before the reserves around the well have become exhausted. The general thought of bacterial plugging around an oil or gas well would sound far fetched given the extreme environments that exist at those locations.

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Microbial Corrosion in the oil and gas sector; and BART tests

One of the very important and major concerns in the oil and gas sector is corrosion. This is often linked to the sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). Corrosion costs money, time and failures. Preventative maintenance using the APB- and the SRB- BARTs can save that money and time and also prevent failure through the appropriate treatment applications.

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Bacteria Biotech in Oil Industry

Because of the ability of bacteria to break down a variety of compounds into their basic elements, bacteria are used extensively in environmental biotechnology. One of the applications where bacteria are gaining greater use is in the oil industry.

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Spot oil spills and leaks with the help of colour coded bacteria

Oil spills and other environmental pollution, including low level leaks from underground pipes and storage tanks, could be quickly and easily spotted in the future using colour coded bacteria.

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Galvanic cathodic protection and Impressed cathodic protection

Recently, the galvanic or sacrificial anodes are made by using alloys of zinc, magnesium and aluminium. The current capacity and consumption rate of these alloys are superior for cathodic protection than iron. Galvanic anodes are designed and selected to have a more "active" voltage than the metal of the structure (typically steel). The galvanic anode continues to corrode, consuming the anode material until eventually it must be replaced.

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Cathodic protection (CP) of iron and steel

Metal dowels and cramps were often incorporated in traditional masonry structures to secure stones, such as copings, parapets and cornices, that might otherwise be prone to movement or displacement. They were also widely used in ordinary ashlar walls to tie relatively thin stone facings back to the core. Dowels and cramps were also embedded in the facing itself to help maintain its structural integrity.

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Some Scientists develop safer parts for cars

Materials known as thermoplastic fiber composites can be replaced less-suitable materials in stressed load-bearing structures and crash components in automobiles.

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Stress Corrosion can Leads to Detachment of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) Nano Layer

The diamond-like carbon has subsequently withstood endless in vitro tests in several manufacturers’ laboratories and has shown itself to be well tolerated by human tissue, extremely hard wearing, and resistant to the relatively aggressive environment in the human body. Despite this, when DLC-coated joints were first implanted into human patients, serious problems arose after only a few years. The DLC coatings were not worn away, but rather they detached from the implant material for no apparent reason.

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Bristle Blasting Process is a Corrosion Removal Method

A newly developed surface preparation process, bristle blasting is presented that can satisfy all of the tasks in a single step. Like grit blasting, the bristle blasting process is an impact/crater-formation based technique that repeatedly strikes the target surface with sufficient kinetic energy to remove contamination and expose a fresh, consistently textured surface.

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Development of a non-toxic corrosion inhibitor for a MEA Plant

Using MEA as a sweetening agent, amine plants always exhibit some degree of corrosion. The latter is minimized by keeping the amine clean, holding acid gas loading within specifications, operating the still at the lowest temperature possible and maintaining a regular testing program.

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Microbes Can Quickly Degrade A Popular Biofuel

Biodiesel has become a popular fuel. It is worldwide production now exceeding 10 million tons per year. Yet like all energy sources, biodiesel has its share of drawbacks.

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Leaching and Selective Metallic Corrosion

The removal of one element from a solid solution alloy is often called leaching. The gradual loss of zinc from brass (dezincification) is perhaps the most well known example of this type of corrosion, but aluminium can also be leached from aluminium bronzes (dealuminification) and nickel from 70/30 Cupronickel alloys (denickelification).

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Metal loss anomalies and GEs inspection

Metal loss anomalies can be introduced at all stages of a pipeline’s life – during manufacturing, in construction or while in service through material defects, gouges, corrosion, etc. Metal loss anomalies are characterised by an area of pipe wall with a measurable reduction in its thickness.

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Corrosion found in oil pipeline that fouled river

Oil Rushing into the Kalamazoo River
Federal regulators (Washington) said that corrosion tests had done in 2009, found “metal loss anomalies” along the pipeline that sent thousands of gallons of oil rushing into the Kalamazoo River that week.

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